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Author Topic: Pike and muskie attacking people?  (Read 7148 times)
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rockinmichigan
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« on: January 14, 2010, 03:13:27 PM »

Hello all, I just watched a couple different episodes of "MonsterQuest" last night on the History Channel, and I couldn't believe a couple things. First of all, debate aside of how good or bad the show is, or how smart or stupid the material is. Both episodes were about big freshwater/saltwater fish. They talked about the monster catfish species in the Amazon and in China, monster groupers off the coast of Florida, and a couple stories that surprised me some. They talked about northern pike and muskies that have attacked people wading in shallow water, like in Minnesota and Wisconsin. I guess they do, although rarely, but I had never heard of them doing that before, either muskies or northern pike. What I have for you now is a question: Have you ever heard, seen, or had that happen to you? Could this be a story to you like it was to me, surprising? I mean, I'm not calling those people that came on the show and talked about their attack stories liars or whatever, but I had never heard of such things. News to you or useless tidbits that you have long known about?
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pegsguy
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2010, 03:54:03 PM »

I recall reading a report in a "believe it or not" style column in a local paper about a fellow who fell asleep in a boat in Wi. and his hand dropped overboard. According to the report a northern or muskie latched on to his hand/wrist and he jerked his hand and the fish back into the boat earning him a citation for illegal fishing from a conservation agent. I watched the same Monster Quest episodes last night and while some of the jounralism on that show is suspect, explain all the one legged geese and ducks. Tom
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Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will be frustrated for a lifetime!
rockinmichigan
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2010, 04:09:49 PM »

Yeah, a lot of the stuff on those shows is suspect, finding monster sharks isn't what I think is "MonsterQuest" material, finding Bigfoot is. That aside, I guess I shouldn't be too shocked. Then again, I do find it hard to believe that a northern pike is just gonna see a person's ankle and decide it was hungry enough to attack the ankle. Maybe it was a territory thing, I don't know how muskie or pike are as far as protecting nests, but maybe that can come into play. Anybody know anything about that sort of scenerio? Going after hands for food I can believe, maybe mistaking a finger in muddy water for a something they'd normally eat. A couple people made it sound like muskies went after them much the same manner a shark would, and that part I do find questionable. Maybe I'm wrong, but like I said before I don't want to call them liars, but just the matter of the attack.
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pegsguy
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2010, 08:55:02 PM »

An attack in shallow water in the spring (read spawn) is very believable as a territorial thing but what about the guy in the boat? I'm not sure what time of year it happened but it is hard to believe that an esox found a human hand threatening(If that story is true). Tom
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Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will be frustrated for a lifetime!
rockinmichigan
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2010, 10:21:19 PM »

Well, I don't know how much pike and muskie are into worms, but maybe if that story is true (without knowing a lot of deep details) that maybe the pike mistook the fella's fingers for worms. Now, to go into pike and worms, I do remember one time about seven years ago in July of '03, me and some friends were camping and fishing at this inland lake in the Northern L.P. of Michigan, called Grass Lake, which is about a half hour west of Alpena. A day or so before me and a buddy Mike left (the four others stayed a couple extra days) Mike was fooling around with a soft plastic worm and caught himself a northern pike not far from our 12' aluminum boat. If I recall right the water was fairly clear, and not real deep of water in which I'd guesstimate it being probably no deeper then 6'. It was a hair and a nick over 24", but I'm not sure how rare that is that they'd go after worms.
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Cheech
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« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2010, 01:03:33 PM »

Pike & Muskies will go after just about anything. Heard many stories and warnings not to dangle your feet in such waters.

 LINK






















One story...

Some are calling it the "JAWS" of the Midwest after a fresh water fish attacks a nine-year-old boy.

Paris Copeland and his family were enjoying a swim in a Minnesota lake on Monday, but it only took seconds for their lazy day, to turn scary.

After a couple hours of splashing around…

"There was tons of blood," says Paris.

Paris was ready to pack up and go home.

“I felt pain and I ran back to my parents and then we went home,” Paris says.

Turns out a musky or possibly a northern pike was looking for lunch and that fish caused quite a commotion:

"I wonder how many people we freaked out, it was like “JAWS," says Westy Copeland, Paris’ mom.

But local biologists say the underwater predators aren't a joking matter. In fact, some can grow to weigh more than 30 pounds and…

"Muskies have a mouthful of teeth and big teeth," says DNR Fisheries Supervisor Bob Hujik.

But before you run from the water in western Wisconsin.

"Are people at risk? Probably not," Hujik tells us.

Hujik says muskies and northerns aren't likely to attack.

"They see the movement,” he says. “It's not like they're hungry and going to eat you, it's just a reaction."

A reaction anglers love to see:

"Muskies are the hardest to catch, but it’s very rewarding when you do pull one in," says Musky Guide Darrin Engstrom.

But Engstrom says you're lucky to get that chance.

"As soon as they see you in the water, they're probably going to swim away," Engstrom says.

As for Paris, he's ready to get back in the lake and Engstrom says his scar is more of a trophy.

"It's not a good day in the water unless there's blood on your hands,” he says.


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rockinmichigan
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« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2010, 01:39:34 PM »

LOL Just made up another reason the last couple days why I don't want to go wading or swimming in lakes, beaches, rivers, etc. I haven't gone wading without some sort of waders or boots in years mainly because I don't trust the snapping turtles around here. I've seen some biggun snappers around here, and looks like I'll do the same when I know where the northerns and muskie are. 
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Cheech
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« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2010, 04:37:47 PM »

Better to err on the side of caution in toothy waters. biggrin

http://www.igorilla.com/gorilla/animal/fish_attacks_in_Wisconsin.html

Report forwarded to the Animal Attack Files by Special Correspondant P.
Johnson:

>From the North American Fisherman Official Publication of the
North American Fishing Club October/November 1998

Wisconsin Man Catches a Tiger by the Toe
Undated

Dodgeville, WI
The story involving Dan Droessler of Platteville, Wisconsin and a
hungry tiger muskie is one right out of the "Can you believe it?" file.

Dan was dangling his foot over the side of his canoe on Twin Valley
Lake when a 36-inch muskie decided it was time for a snack.

The bite, naturally, startled Dan, who jerked his foot (and the fish)
out of the water and into the canoe.

But the story doesn't end there. Sporting 60 new stitches in his foot,
Dan agreed to be interviewed by a local reporter. He told the writer he
kept the fish and planned to have his unusual trophy mounted.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources stepped in, however,
confiscating the fish with the explanation that it wasn't caught on
hook-and-line and that it didn't meet the 40-inch minimum length limit.

Droessler pled his case, though, and was allowed to keep the fish after
paying a $10.55 special permit fee.

This isn't the first time a muskie has chomped a human. Back in 1995, a
14-year-old Minnesota boy, swimming at a public beach on Lake Rebecca,
was bitten on the right hand and wrist. He was leaving the water during
a routine safety break called by lifeguards when the fish attacked.

The 38-inch fish was netted by fisheries personnel and relocated to
another part of the lake.
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rockinmichigan
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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2010, 12:11:15 AM »

That story about Dan Droessler is almost funny. He probably should his other foot overboard and might've been able to land one that met the minimum length  lol2
By the by, I don't know what the minimum length in Ohio is (probably should look that up since I now live in Toledo, OH and do some fishing in Ohio) but I do know that its 42" in Michigan.  drink
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pegsguy
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« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2010, 11:27:51 AM »

I think that Droessler story may well be the genisis of the story I related. We all know how these stories change with re-telling. Tom
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Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will be frustrated for a lifetime!
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